Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2017

DOI

10.1038/s41598-017-00875-5

Publication Title

Scientific Reports

Volume

7

Issue

1

Pages

995 (1-7)

Abstract

Under a warming climate, amplification of the water cycle and changes in precipitation patterns over land are expected to occur, subsequently impacting the terrestrial water balance. On global scales, such changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) will be reflected in the water contained in the ocean and can manifest as global sea level variations. Naturally occurring climate-driven TWS variability can temporarily obscure the long-term trend in sea level rise, in addition to modulating the impacts of sea level rise through natural periodic undulation in regional and global sea level. The internal variability of the global water cycle, therefore, confounds both the detection and attribution of sea level rise. Here, we use a suite of observations to quantify and map the contribution of TWS variability to sea level variability on decadal timescales. In particular, we find that decadal sea level variability centered in the Pacific Ocean is closely tied to low frequency variability of TWS in key areas across the globe. The unambiguous identification and clean separation of this component of variability is the missing step in uncovering the anthropogenic trend in sea level and understanding the potential for low-frequency modulation of future TWS impacts including flooding and drought.

Comments

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Original Publication Citation

Hamlington, B. D., Reager, J. T., Lo, M. H., Karnauskas, K. B., & Leben, R. R. (2017). Separating decadal global water cycle variability from sea level rise. Scientific Reports 7(1), 995. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-00875-5

ORCID

0000-0002-2315-6425 (Hamlington)

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