Date of Award

Spring 2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Counseling and Human Services

Committee Director

Tim Grothaus

Committee Member

Kaprea F. Johnson

Committee Member

Tammi Dice

Abstract

The primary researcher conducted a phenomenological study on cross-racial trust factors between Black doctoral students (n = 10) and their White mentors within the counseling profession. Three participants identified having a White professor as a mentor; two participants identified having White supervisors as mentors; five of the participants reported having both faculty members and supervisors as White mentors. Through semi-structured interviews, the primary researcher sought to ascertain what factors engendered cross-racial trust between Black doctoral students and White mentors within the counseling profession. The research team identified four superordinate themes related to cross-racial trust: contributors to trust, reasons for mistrust, critical consciousness, and benefits of cross-racial mentoring. In addition, the research team identified 22 themes and 22 subthemes through consensual coding of the data. The findings of this study may inform multicultural competence and practice in mentoring and supervision within counselor education.

ISBN

9780355045505

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