Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2016

DOI

10.3141/2530-01

Publication Title

Transportation Research Record

Issue

2530

Pages

1-8

Abstract

This study examines public preferences for two revenue options—fuel taxes and tolls—to finance transportation infrastructure in an urban area with the use of the results of a survey of residents of the Hampton Roads region of southeastern Virginia. Specifically, the study addresses two related research questions: (a) To what extent do residents support instituting tolls, increasing the fuel tax, or both? (b) What roles do self-interest and ideological beliefs play in support of increasing the fuel tax, imposing tolls, or doing both? The study finds that 50% of respondents expressed a willingness to support fuel taxes or tolls for infrastructure, 29% for increasing fuel taxes, and 28% for tolls, with 7% supporting both revenue options. The study also finds that the support for each funding source is associated with a different set of ideological beliefs and self-interest factors. Implications for generating public support for increases in revenue and funding for transportation facilities are discussed.

Original Publication Citation

Yusuf, J.-E.W., O’Connell, L., Anuar, K.A., & Mahar, K. (2016). Paying for infrastructure in an urban environment: Roles of ideological beliefs and self-interest in support for two funding mechanisms. Transportation Research Record(2530), 1-8. doi: 10.3141/2530-01

ORCID

0000-0003-3599-1417 (Yusuf), 0000-0002-3727-3016 (O'Connell), 0000-0001-7006-6601 (Anuar), 0000-0001-5013-2464 (Mahar)

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