Event Title

Real Time Multi-Class Facial Expression Recognition For Therapeutic Aid In Autism Spectrum Disorders

Presentation Type

Event

Disciplines

Biomedical | Engineering | Mental and Social Health

Description/Abstract

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, nonverbal communication, and relationship building. Earlier studies report oddity as lack of natural traits in the facial expressions of affected individuals. The development of therapeutic tools to train and correct oddity in facial expressions may help children with ASD overcome related challenges in nonverbal communication. The goal of this project is to develop a real-time software application for recognizing facial expressions from live video feed to supplement a research platform for studying the efficacy of robot-mediated intervention in children with ASD.

Comments

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Khan M. Iftekharuddin

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Start Date

13-2-2016 8:00 AM

End Date

13-2-2016 12:30 PM

Full Text of Presentation

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Feb 13th, 8:00 AM Feb 13th, 12:30 PM

Real Time Multi-Class Facial Expression Recognition For Therapeutic Aid In Autism Spectrum Disorders

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, nonverbal communication, and relationship building. Earlier studies report oddity as lack of natural traits in the facial expressions of affected individuals. The development of therapeutic tools to train and correct oddity in facial expressions may help children with ASD overcome related challenges in nonverbal communication. The goal of this project is to develop a real-time software application for recognizing facial expressions from live video feed to supplement a research platform for studying the efficacy of robot-mediated intervention in children with ASD.