Event Title

Impacts of Beliefs and Personality on Ratings of Technology-Mediated Interviews When That Technology Malfunctions

Student Presenter Information

Rachel E. Green, Old Dominion University

Presentation Type

Event

Disciplines

Psychology

Description/Abstract

Videoconferencing technology is used frequently by organizations in the interview process because it offers increased convenience in comparison to face-to-face interviews; however, little research has examined the impact of malfunctions during such interviews. This study examined the effect of technology malfunctions on ratings of interviewees by experimentally assigning participants to view a recording of either a 24 pristine videoconference interview or a recording of the same videoconferencing interview with addition of technology malfunctions. Participants’ locus of control and prior beliefs about videoconferencing were hypothesized as moderators of the relationship between technology malfunction and ratings of the interviewee in the recorded interview.

Comments

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Richard N. Landers

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1311

Start Date

13-2-2016 11:30 AM

End Date

13-2-2016 12:30 PM

Full Text of Presentation

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Feb 13th, 11:30 AM Feb 13th, 12:30 PM

Impacts of Beliefs and Personality on Ratings of Technology-Mediated Interviews When That Technology Malfunctions

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1311

Videoconferencing technology is used frequently by organizations in the interview process because it offers increased convenience in comparison to face-to-face interviews; however, little research has examined the impact of malfunctions during such interviews. This study examined the effect of technology malfunctions on ratings of interviewees by experimentally assigning participants to view a recording of either a 24 pristine videoconference interview or a recording of the same videoconferencing interview with addition of technology malfunctions. Participants’ locus of control and prior beliefs about videoconferencing were hypothesized as moderators of the relationship between technology malfunction and ratings of the interviewee in the recorded interview.