Event Title

Improving the Efficiency of Compton Scattering Calculations

Presenter Information

John Rattz, Old Dominion University

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Conference Room 1310

Start Date

18-2-2017 10:15 AM

End Date

18-2-2017 11:15 AM

Description

Compton or Thomson scattering can be used in constructing sources of high energy photons. In recent years there has been a revival of activity in the subject driven by the desire to produce several keV X-ray sources from relatively compact relativistic electron accelerators. Such sources are attractive due to the narrow bandwidth generated in the output radiation. We have developed a calculation method yielding the energy spectral distribution of the radiation produced by the scattering event, and extended it so that the radiation from a group of relativistic electrons may be obtained. The heart of the project was a program that performed an adaptive 2D integration. The goal was to improve the program’s performance by translating it from Python to C++. There were several differences between how the two implementations performed the same task, with these differences being relevant to the program’s performance.

Comments

Mentor: Drs. Balsa Terzic, Mohammed Zubair, and Desh Ranjan

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 18th, 10:15 AM Feb 18th, 11:15 AM

Improving the Efficiency of Compton Scattering Calculations

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Conference Room 1310

Compton or Thomson scattering can be used in constructing sources of high energy photons. In recent years there has been a revival of activity in the subject driven by the desire to produce several keV X-ray sources from relatively compact relativistic electron accelerators. Such sources are attractive due to the narrow bandwidth generated in the output radiation. We have developed a calculation method yielding the energy spectral distribution of the radiation produced by the scattering event, and extended it so that the radiation from a group of relativistic electrons may be obtained. The heart of the project was a program that performed an adaptive 2D integration. The goal was to improve the program’s performance by translating it from Python to C++. There were several differences between how the two implementations performed the same task, with these differences being relevant to the program’s performance.