Event Title

Investigating the Broad Host Range of Bacteriophage in Different Mycobacterial Species

Student Presenter Information

Delilah Hahn, Old Dominion University

Presentation Type

Event

Description/Abstract

Bacteriophages are ubiquitous and usually infect a specific bacterial strain. Typically, phages are confined to a single host capable of infecting a specific genus and species of bacteria. In order to determine if bacteriophage have more than one host, a panel of phages have been investigated to determine if these phage have a broad host range. Originally, the phages were isolated with Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155. The goal of this project was to determine if the phage have a broad host range by testing each phage on different bacterial hosts within the Actinobacteria phylum. In total, thirty phage and eight different bacterial hosts were investigated: Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155, Mycobacterium smegmatis NSC 3240, Mycobacterium fortuitum M5, Mycobacterium fortuitum M6, Mycobacterium chelonae M3, Mycobacterium chelonae 324-818, Mycobacterium marinum ATCC 927 , and Mycobacterium marinum M30-01. The experimental protocol entailed preparing serial dilutions of each isolated bacteriophage (10-2, 10-4, 10-6, and 10-8) followed by spotting of each dilution on a nutrient agar plate containing a bacterial lawn made from each strain. Subsequently, the plates were incubated at 30°C and observed for the presence of plaques or zones of killing. The results revealed that in addition to infecting M. smegmatis mc2 155, eleven phage were able to also infect M. smegmatis NSC 3240, two phage infected M. fortuitum M5, and one phage infected M. fortuitum M6. The titers of the phage and the efficiency of infection was calculated using the phage titers from M. smegmatis mc2 155 as the control. These findings indicate that some bacteriophage actually have a broader host range than originally thought. However, the range of hosts may be limited due to the genomic composition and evolution of each distinct phage.

Comments

Mentor: Dr. Nazir Barekzi
Biological Sciences

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Start Date

18-2-2017 8:00 AM

End Date

18-2-2017 12:30 PM

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Feb 18th, 8:00 AM Feb 18th, 12:30 PM

Investigating the Broad Host Range of Bacteriophage in Different Mycobacterial Species

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Bacteriophages are ubiquitous and usually infect a specific bacterial strain. Typically, phages are confined to a single host capable of infecting a specific genus and species of bacteria. In order to determine if bacteriophage have more than one host, a panel of phages have been investigated to determine if these phage have a broad host range. Originally, the phages were isolated with Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155. The goal of this project was to determine if the phage have a broad host range by testing each phage on different bacterial hosts within the Actinobacteria phylum. In total, thirty phage and eight different bacterial hosts were investigated: Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155, Mycobacterium smegmatis NSC 3240, Mycobacterium fortuitum M5, Mycobacterium fortuitum M6, Mycobacterium chelonae M3, Mycobacterium chelonae 324-818, Mycobacterium marinum ATCC 927 , and Mycobacterium marinum M30-01. The experimental protocol entailed preparing serial dilutions of each isolated bacteriophage (10-2, 10-4, 10-6, and 10-8) followed by spotting of each dilution on a nutrient agar plate containing a bacterial lawn made from each strain. Subsequently, the plates were incubated at 30°C and observed for the presence of plaques or zones of killing. The results revealed that in addition to infecting M. smegmatis mc2 155, eleven phage were able to also infect M. smegmatis NSC 3240, two phage infected M. fortuitum M5, and one phage infected M. fortuitum M6. The titers of the phage and the efficiency of infection was calculated using the phage titers from M. smegmatis mc2 155 as the control. These findings indicate that some bacteriophage actually have a broader host range than originally thought. However, the range of hosts may be limited due to the genomic composition and evolution of each distinct phage.