Event Title

Tick Diversity and Abundance in the Foothills of Upper Carmel Valley, California

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Start Date

8-4-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2017 10:00 AM

Description

Hastings Natural History Reservation (HNHR), located in the northern portion of the Santa Lucia mountain range in Central California, serves as a diverse biological fieldwork site. Through ongoing conservation efforts, Hastings offers an excellent sample of species representation for the region. This research presents an ecological survey of tick species from 2012 to 2016, as well as an exploration of the relationships between weather, phenology, and numbers collected. Dermacentor occidentalis was found to be the most prevalent species at Hastings, with Ixodes pacificus the second most prevalent. Tick sampling was done by flagging and human collection. These data will allow HNHR and the neighboring communities to begin to better understand the ecology of tick populations, which in turn will provide insights into the potential risk for tick-borne diseases in the region.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 8th, 8:30 AM Apr 8th, 10:00 AM

Tick Diversity and Abundance in the Foothills of Upper Carmel Valley, California

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Hastings Natural History Reservation (HNHR), located in the northern portion of the Santa Lucia mountain range in Central California, serves as a diverse biological fieldwork site. Through ongoing conservation efforts, Hastings offers an excellent sample of species representation for the region. This research presents an ecological survey of tick species from 2012 to 2016, as well as an exploration of the relationships between weather, phenology, and numbers collected. Dermacentor occidentalis was found to be the most prevalent species at Hastings, with Ixodes pacificus the second most prevalent. Tick sampling was done by flagging and human collection. These data will allow HNHR and the neighboring communities to begin to better understand the ecology of tick populations, which in turn will provide insights into the potential risk for tick-borne diseases in the region.