Event Title

Investigating the Role of Orexin in Cannabinoid Reward and Feeding Behaviors in Female Rats

Presenter Information

Emily Hilton, Radford University

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Start Date

8-4-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2017 10:00 AM

Description

Emerging evidence has established a role for orexin, a hunger neuropeptide, in modulating the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, especially cannabinoids. However, cannabinoid exposure in rodents leads to a loss in body weight due to decreased food intake. Thus, it is important to more clearly elucidate the role of orexin signaling in the behavioral effects of cannabinoids. To that end, adolescent female rats were divided into 3 treatment groups: synthetic cannabinoid agonist (CP-55,940) exposure (0.35 mg/kg; i.p.), food-yoked control, or saline control. Following a battery of behavioral tasks, rats were transcardially perfused and brains were collected for sectioning through the limbic cortices. Tissue sections will be stained for orexin immunoreactivity in the nucleus accumbens. It is expected that orexin levels will be higher in the CP 55,940-exposed group compared to the food-yoked and saline control group. These results could inform better treatment options for marijuana-related use and abuse.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 8th, 8:30 AM Apr 8th, 10:00 AM

Investigating the Role of Orexin in Cannabinoid Reward and Feeding Behaviors in Female Rats

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Emerging evidence has established a role for orexin, a hunger neuropeptide, in modulating the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, especially cannabinoids. However, cannabinoid exposure in rodents leads to a loss in body weight due to decreased food intake. Thus, it is important to more clearly elucidate the role of orexin signaling in the behavioral effects of cannabinoids. To that end, adolescent female rats were divided into 3 treatment groups: synthetic cannabinoid agonist (CP-55,940) exposure (0.35 mg/kg; i.p.), food-yoked control, or saline control. Following a battery of behavioral tasks, rats were transcardially perfused and brains were collected for sectioning through the limbic cortices. Tissue sections will be stained for orexin immunoreactivity in the nucleus accumbens. It is expected that orexin levels will be higher in the CP 55,940-exposed group compared to the food-yoked and saline control group. These results could inform better treatment options for marijuana-related use and abuse.