Event Title

Is the Supraglottic Airway Laryngopharyngeal Tube (SALT) an Effective Tool in Pre-hospital Airway Management?

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Start Date

8-4-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2017 10:00 AM

Description

Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is hailed as the “gold standard” for paramedics to achieve a patent airway. However, ETI using direct laryngoscopy (DL) may be complicated by trauma, blood, or emesis. Thus, supraglottic airways (SGA’s) were developed for “blind intubation”. One such emerging airway is the supraglottic airway laryngopharyngeal tube (SALT). The SALT acts as an oropharyngeal airway with a curved shape that is designed to fit the anatomical airway. BLS-level providers may ventilate the patient through the SALT. Additionally, an ALS provider may blindly insert an endotracheal tube (ETT) through the SALT. Studies involving manikins and simulations have shown favorable results in terms of the SALT’s efficacy and efficiency, but few have been undertaken involving human subjects. Thus, a thorough literature review was conducted to find all clinical studies involving the SALT. Results collected from the review will be used in comparison to data retrieved from Portsmouth Fire and Rescue.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 8th, 8:30 AM Apr 8th, 10:00 AM

Is the Supraglottic Airway Laryngopharyngeal Tube (SALT) an Effective Tool in Pre-hospital Airway Management?

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is hailed as the “gold standard” for paramedics to achieve a patent airway. However, ETI using direct laryngoscopy (DL) may be complicated by trauma, blood, or emesis. Thus, supraglottic airways (SGA’s) were developed for “blind intubation”. One such emerging airway is the supraglottic airway laryngopharyngeal tube (SALT). The SALT acts as an oropharyngeal airway with a curved shape that is designed to fit the anatomical airway. BLS-level providers may ventilate the patient through the SALT. Additionally, an ALS provider may blindly insert an endotracheal tube (ETT) through the SALT. Studies involving manikins and simulations have shown favorable results in terms of the SALT’s efficacy and efficiency, but few have been undertaken involving human subjects. Thus, a thorough literature review was conducted to find all clinical studies involving the SALT. Results collected from the review will be used in comparison to data retrieved from Portsmouth Fire and Rescue.