Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Start Date

8-4-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2017 10:00 AM

Description

Studies reveal that low income is a significant risk factor for depression and only roughly 25% of children with mental illnesses receive adequate help, the majority of which comes from schools. This study establishes guidelines for depression intervention programs in low-income high schools through a literature review of current practices. This study found that a multi-layered approach with screening, universal education, and high-risk intervention is most effective. Screening should be conducted with a modified PHQ-a test and timely clinical interviews by school psychologists. All students and teachers should receive universal depression education curriculum consisting of principles like depression literacy and asset theory. It is vital that students screened positively for depression or suicidality receive high-risk intervention, ranging from group therapy to referrals based on individual severity. By taking a multidimensional approach addressing all three aspects, school administrations can ensure that adequate resources are being directed to those most in need.

Comments

Research Advisor: Professor Mary C. Boyes

Keywords: Socioeconomically disadvantaged, adolescent, depression, mental health, high school, intervention

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 8th, 8:30 AM Apr 8th, 10:00 AM

Depression in Low-Income Adolescents: Guidelines for School-Based Depression Intervention Programs

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, West Foyer

Studies reveal that low income is a significant risk factor for depression and only roughly 25% of children with mental illnesses receive adequate help, the majority of which comes from schools. This study establishes guidelines for depression intervention programs in low-income high schools through a literature review of current practices. This study found that a multi-layered approach with screening, universal education, and high-risk intervention is most effective. Screening should be conducted with a modified PHQ-a test and timely clinical interviews by school psychologists. All students and teachers should receive universal depression education curriculum consisting of principles like depression literacy and asset theory. It is vital that students screened positively for depression or suicidality receive high-risk intervention, ranging from group therapy to referrals based on individual severity. By taking a multidimensional approach addressing all three aspects, school administrations can ensure that adequate resources are being directed to those most in need.