Event Title

Negro Musicians and Their Music: “Musicians of Color” in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1313

Start Date

8-4-2017 9:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2017 9:50 AM

Description

Many would be quite puzzled if asked to name musicians of color who were both talented in their own right and capable of standing out musically in a time when the world was seemingly dominated by a singular race. However, the olden days have seen many champions of the musical arts and these individuals were of color and their music was of the highest quality. To even further the surprise, these individuals were not only male, but also joined by female artists who were just as capable as any other creator of music: Luranah Ira Aldridge, Montegue Ring, Brindis De Sala, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and lastly, Le Chevalier De Saint Georges. Each one of these individuals of color, ranging from the eighteenth century to the nineteenth, all have something in common: they proved that individuals of African descent were just as talented as any other individual when it came to music.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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Apr 8th, 9:30 AM Apr 8th, 9:50 AM

Negro Musicians and Their Music: “Musicians of Color” in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1313

Many would be quite puzzled if asked to name musicians of color who were both talented in their own right and capable of standing out musically in a time when the world was seemingly dominated by a singular race. However, the olden days have seen many champions of the musical arts and these individuals were of color and their music was of the highest quality. To even further the surprise, these individuals were not only male, but also joined by female artists who were just as capable as any other creator of music: Luranah Ira Aldridge, Montegue Ring, Brindis De Sala, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and lastly, Le Chevalier De Saint Georges. Each one of these individuals of color, ranging from the eighteenth century to the nineteenth, all have something in common: they proved that individuals of African descent were just as talented as any other individual when it came to music.