Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1311

Start Date

8-4-2017 1:10 PM

End Date

8-4-2017 1:30 PM

Description

Treating Alzheimer’s disease, especially through non-pharmaceutical means, has become increasingly important over the past few decades. I examined the use of melody, rhyme, and rhythm as encoding mechanisms to aid in the retrieval of long term semantic information by juxtaposing previous experiments in the field. Melody, rhyme, and rhythm provide an organizational structure to facilitate the encoding of information. Specifically, chunking, the grouping of smaller units into larger ‘chunks’, helps facilitate long term encoding in patients, and is the byproduct of the organizational structure of a text. A major drawback of using these devices is the loss in the depth of encoding semantic information; however, it is important to recognize music still assists general content memory. Therefore, Alzheimer's patients would benefit from the use of melody as it would help with familiarity with their surroundings, although they would not benefit from instructional song.

Comments

Research Advisor: Mary Boyes

Keywords: Alzheimers, Memory, Semantic, Melody, Encoding, Storage, Retrieval, Rhythm

Presentation Type

Presentation

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Apr 8th, 1:10 PM Apr 8th, 1:30 PM

The Use of Rhyme, Rhythm, and Melody as a Form of Repetition Priming to Aid in Encoding, Storage, and Retrieval of Semantic Memories in Alzheimer’s Patients

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1311

Treating Alzheimer’s disease, especially through non-pharmaceutical means, has become increasingly important over the past few decades. I examined the use of melody, rhyme, and rhythm as encoding mechanisms to aid in the retrieval of long term semantic information by juxtaposing previous experiments in the field. Melody, rhyme, and rhythm provide an organizational structure to facilitate the encoding of information. Specifically, chunking, the grouping of smaller units into larger ‘chunks’, helps facilitate long term encoding in patients, and is the byproduct of the organizational structure of a text. A major drawback of using these devices is the loss in the depth of encoding semantic information; however, it is important to recognize music still assists general content memory. Therefore, Alzheimer's patients would benefit from the use of melody as it would help with familiarity with their surroundings, although they would not benefit from instructional song.