Event Title

The Isolation and Elucidation of Antimicrobial Compounds from Native Southwest Virginia Plants

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1307

Start Date

8-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

8-4-2017 1:50 PM

Description

Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections.1 Medication resistant microbes are not restricted to bacteria, the incidence of antifungal resistance is also increasing. Antifungal resistant Candida albicans is of particular threat to public health because Candida is the most common cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections in the United States.2 After analyzing Native American ethnobotanical records, several plants were selected because of their history of use in treating Candida albicans infections. These plants were collected from Southwest Virginia and processed. Ethanolic extracts of these plants were screened for Candidacidal activity, as well as activity against other microbes. Out of the 19 plants collected, 6 were found to be active against Candida, and the activity of the extracts is currently being explored.

Presentation Type

Presentation

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 8th, 1:30 PM Apr 8th, 1:50 PM

The Isolation and Elucidation of Antimicrobial Compounds from Native Southwest Virginia Plants

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1307

Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections.1 Medication resistant microbes are not restricted to bacteria, the incidence of antifungal resistance is also increasing. Antifungal resistant Candida albicans is of particular threat to public health because Candida is the most common cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections in the United States.2 After analyzing Native American ethnobotanical records, several plants were selected because of their history of use in treating Candida albicans infections. These plants were collected from Southwest Virginia and processed. Ethanolic extracts of these plants were screened for Candidacidal activity, as well as activity against other microbes. Out of the 19 plants collected, 6 were found to be active against Candida, and the activity of the extracts is currently being explored.