Event Title

The Effect of Light on Symbiosis of the Temperate Coral Astrangia Poculata

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1307

Start Date

8-4-2017 1:50 PM

End Date

8-4-2017 2:10 PM

Description

Corals have a mutualistic relationship with symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) called symbiosis, where each organism receives benefits. Many corals display this mutualistic relationship, which are termed symbiotic. However, there are some that do not, which are termed aposymbiotic. This study researches the effect of light on symbiosis in the Northern Star coral (Astrangia poculata) over an 8-week period. A total of 28 nubbins, 14 symbiotic and 14 aposymbiotic, are evenly separated into a high light treatment (200 μmol m- 2 s- 1) and a low light treatment (40 μmol m- 2 s- 1 ). The methods used in this study are the photo Symbiodinium quantification method (Symbiodinium density) from Winters et al. 2009, as well as the buoyant weight technique (skeletal growth rates) from Davies 1989.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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Apr 8th, 1:50 PM Apr 8th, 2:10 PM

The Effect of Light on Symbiosis of the Temperate Coral Astrangia Poculata

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1307

Corals have a mutualistic relationship with symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) called symbiosis, where each organism receives benefits. Many corals display this mutualistic relationship, which are termed symbiotic. However, there are some that do not, which are termed aposymbiotic. This study researches the effect of light on symbiosis in the Northern Star coral (Astrangia poculata) over an 8-week period. A total of 28 nubbins, 14 symbiotic and 14 aposymbiotic, are evenly separated into a high light treatment (200 μmol m- 2 s- 1) and a low light treatment (40 μmol m- 2 s- 1 ). The methods used in this study are the photo Symbiodinium quantification method (Symbiodinium density) from Winters et al. 2009, as well as the buoyant weight technique (skeletal growth rates) from Davies 1989.