Event Title

Survey of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Carmel Valley, California

Location

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1307

Start Date

8-4-2017 2:40 PM

End Date

8-4-2017 3:00 PM

Description

Ixodes pacificus is a black-legged tick found primarily on the West coast of the United States. This study surveys populations of I. pacificus ticks collected in the Hastings Natural History Reserve (HNHR) in California for the prevalence of pathogens they carry and examines any possible correlations between the tick populations and pathogens. Black-legged ticks were collected from HNHR during the summers of 2012-2016. The collected ticks were tested for the three pathogens above using real time PCR. Tick DNA that tested positive for any of these pathogens were amplified using PCR and sequenced to confirm identification of the tick species and the respective pathogen. Local surveys in HNHR should be continued to monitor tick populations and prevalence of pathogens to ensure awareness to the public in this area and advise preventative measures against possible tick-borne diseases.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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Apr 8th, 2:40 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

Survey of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Carmel Valley, California

Old Dominion University, Learning Commons at Perry Library, Room 1307

Ixodes pacificus is a black-legged tick found primarily on the West coast of the United States. This study surveys populations of I. pacificus ticks collected in the Hastings Natural History Reserve (HNHR) in California for the prevalence of pathogens they carry and examines any possible correlations between the tick populations and pathogens. Black-legged ticks were collected from HNHR during the summers of 2012-2016. The collected ticks were tested for the three pathogens above using real time PCR. Tick DNA that tested positive for any of these pathogens were amplified using PCR and sequenced to confirm identification of the tick species and the respective pathogen. Local surveys in HNHR should be continued to monitor tick populations and prevalence of pathogens to ensure awareness to the public in this area and advise preventative measures against possible tick-borne diseases.