Document Type


Publication Date


Publication Title

Physics of Plasmas






013528 (8 pp.)




In this paper, we present the effects of the pulse width (PW) on the plasma jet's discharge characteristics, particularly focusing on the production and correlation of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in gas- and liquid-phase. It is found that the length of plasma jet plume first increases before the PW of 10 μs, then gradually decreases and finally almost remains unchanged beyond 150 μs. The plasma bullet disappears after the falling edge of the voltage pulse at low PW, while it terminates far ahead of the falling edge of voltage pulse at high PW. This is mainly attributed to accumulation of space charges that lead to weakening of the reduced electric field with an increase of PW from low to high. More important, it is found that the excited reactive species, the positive and negative ions from plasma jet, and the concentrations of NO2 and NO3 in deionized water exposed to plasma jet so display the first increasing and then decreasing change trend with increase of PW, while the concentration of H2O2 in water almost displays the linearly increasing trend. This mainly results from the formation of the H3O+ and HO2, as well as their ion water clusters that can produce more OH radicals to be converted into H2O2, while the NO2 and NO3 in gas phase can transport into water and exist most stably in water. The water cluster formation at gas-liquid interface is an important key process that can affect the chemical nature and dose of aqueous RONS in water; this is beneficial for understanding how the RONS are formed in liquid-phase. Published by AIP Publishing.

Original Publication Citation

Liu, Z., Zhou, C., Liu, D., Xu, D., Xia, W., Cui, Q., . . . Kong, M. G. (2018). Production and correlation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas- and liquid-phase generated by helium plasma jets under different pulse widths. Physics of Plasmas, 25(1), 013528. doi:10.1063/1.4999520

Available for download on Friday, January 25, 2019