Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2005

DOI

10.1093/plankt/fbi090

Publication Title

Journal of Plankton Research

Volume

27

Issue

10

Pages

1013-1031

Abstract

A fundamental question regarding marine copepods is how the many species coexist and persist in the oligotrophic environment (i.e. Hutchinson’s paradox). This question is addressed with a stochastic, object-oriented Lagrangian model that explicitly simulates the distinct foraging behaviors of three prominent tropical species: Clausocalanus furcatus, Paracalanus aculeatus and Oithona plumifera. The model also individually tracks all prey cells. Each particle’s motion combines sinking, turbulent diffusion and active swimming when applicable. The model successfully simulates observed size partitioned carbon uptake rates. Based on the model results, the wide-ranging translational ambit employed by C. furcatus is best suited for the acquisition of passive prey while the relatively stationary behavior of O. plumifera promotes the capture of larger, quickly sinking cells. The model results further suggest that the slow velocities and feeding current employed by P. aculeatus are best suited for acquiring the smallest cells though it also has a slight advantage over C. furcatus in acquiring the largest prey. A resource threshold, at a prey concentration of 530 cells mL–1,is consistently exhibited by all three modeled species. Overall, these results imply that the size-partition preferences due to their different foraging behavior contribute to the coexistence of these three species. (c) The Author 2005.

Comments

Web of Science: "Free full-text from publisher."

Original Publication Citation

Wiggert, J. D., Haskell, A. G. E., Paffenhofer, G. A., Hofmann, E. E., & Klinck, J. M. (2005). The role of feeding behavior in sustaining copepod populations in the tropical ocean. Journal of Plankton Research, 27(10), 1013-1031. doi:10.1093/plankt/fbi090

ORCID

0000-0001-6710-4371 (Hofmann), 0000-0003-4312-5201 (Klink)

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