Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2000

Publication Title

Marine Technology Society Journal

Volume

34

Issue

2

Pages

26-33

Abstract

Salinity, a measure of the dissolved salts in seawater, is a fundamental property of seawater and basic to understanding biological and physical processes in coastal waters. In the open ocean long term salinity measurements are identified as necessary to understand global climate studies, hydrological cycle, and circulation. In the coastal oceans, information on salinity is critical to understanding biological effects on ecosystem function such as disease, nursery grounds, or harmful algal blooms and on physical processes such as freshwater runoff estuarine mixing, and coastal currents. While the importance of salinity is recognized, little attention has been given to making routine measurements as to the location and frequency of such measurements. These issues were addressed in a workshop concerned with salinity measurements in coastal oceans, requirements for such, and measurment technology.

Comments

© 2000 Marine Technology Society

Included with the written permission of the publisher.

Original Publication Citation

Woody, C., Shih, E., Miller, J., Royer, T., Atkinson, L. P., & Moody, R. S. (2000). Measurements of salinity in the coastal ocean: A review of requirements and technologies. Marine Technology Society Journal, 34(2), 26-33.

ORCID

0000-0003-2919-100X (Atkinson)

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