Date of Award

Summer 2021

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Counseling & Human Services

Program/Concentration

Counselor Education and Supervision

Committee Director

Alan Schwitzer

Committee Member

Shana Pribesh

Committee Member

Amber Pope

Abstract

International students in U.S. higher education institutions face many emotional, social, and institutional challenges as they navigate their academic and acculturative journeys. College counseling centers serve as valuable support resources, but low utilization rates and high early termination rates among the international student population presents a major concern for the college counseling field. To begin the development of an empirically supported, responsive approach to structuring counseling work with international students, this study utilized a metaanalysis to review the literature on counseling intervention effectiveness. The following questions guided this research: What adjustment outcomes are produced by college counseling interventions across modes in international student-client populations? and Which college counseling intervention modes have the greatest impact on adjustment outcomes in international student-client populations? The meta-analysis indicated that across modes, college counseling centers are, on a small magnitude, positively promoting adjustment and well-being for international students who complete an intervention course. Additionally, the interventions that produced a significant impact on adjustment outcomes in international student-client populations are translated and modified acceptance and commitment bibliotherapy and art therapy. These analyses expand the field of college counseling’s understanding of effective approaches in responding to international students’ unique experiences and needs. They provide recommendations for the future direction of college counselling center programing as well as counselor education course enhancement.

DOI

10.25777/z0wq-qr58

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