Date of Award

Summer 2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program/Concentration

Counseling

Committee Director

Theodore P. Remley, Jr.

Committee Member

Christine Ward

Committee Member

Dana Burnett

Abstract

Resident Assistants (RAs), living on campus and tasked with advising students while keeping them safe, are in a position to identify and refer students who may be at risk for suicide or other mental health issues. This study examined RA ability to identify students at risk for suicide, RA comfort in working with students at risk for suicide, RA actions taken when working with students who may be at risk for suicide, and RA expectations for shared information about students the RAs have referred for counseling because they may be at risk for suicide. The study found that RAs report they are comfortable working with students at risk for suicide; however, the study also found that RAs ability to recognize students who may be at risk for suicide depends on whether or not the student has been trained to know the most critical warning signs of suicide. It was determined that RAs who had suicide prevention training and who were able to identify the most critical warning signs of suicide were more efficacious and less reluctant to work with potentially suicidal students than those who did not.

DOI

10.25777/j7rh-er19

ISBN

9781303512667

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