Date of Award

Winter 1990

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Computer Science

Committee Director

Kurt Maly

Committee Member

Nicholas Murray

Committee Member

David Doughty

Committee Member

Mike Overstreet

Committee Member

Edward Foudriat

Abstract

The High-Performance Computing Initiative from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has defined 20 major challenges in science and engineering which are dependent on the solutions to a number of high-performance computing problems. One of the major areas of focus of this initiative is the development of gigabit rate networks to be used in environments such as the space station or a National Research and Educational Network (NREN).

The strategy here is to use existing network designs as building blocks for achieving higher rates, with the ultimate goal being a gigabit rate network. Two strategies which contribute to achieving this goal are examined in detail.1

FDDI2 is a token ring network based on fiber optics capable of a 100 Mbps rate. Both media access (MAC) and physical layer modifications are considered. A method is presented which allows one to determine maximum utilization based on the token-holding timer settings. Simulation results show that employing the second counter-rotating ring in combination with destination removal has a multiplicative effect greater than the effect which either of the factors have individually on performance. Two 100 Mbps rings can handle loads in the range of 400 to 500 Mbps for traffic with a uniform distribution and fixed packet size. Performance is dependent on the number of nodes, improving as the number increases. A wide range of environments are examined to illustrate robustness, and a method of implementation is discussed.

DOI

10.25777/d8vc-0z35

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