Date of Award

Winter 2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educ Foundations & Leadership

Program/Concentration

Community College Leadership

Committee Director

Mitchell R. Williams

Committee Member

Shana Pribesh

Committee Member

Dennis Gregory

Abstract

The study examined the effect of late registration into on-campus and online classes upon student performance when accounting for completion of a college success skills course and the demographic factors of sex, race/ethnicity, age, and full-time/part-time enrollment status. The data source was 2010-2013 ex post facto data from 23 colleges in a large community college system in the southeastern United States. The statistical method of binary logistic regression was applied to the data. The regression models failed to yield strong predictions of the association between registration timing and student success. Coupled with previous studies, this study demonstrated that the presumed negative interaction between late registration and student success is misplaced. Researchers should turn their attention to student characteristics and behaviors that hold more promise for actionable findings. Colleges should develop more global and integrated strategies for improving student success instead of narrowly focusing on eliminating late registration.

DOI

10.25777/xzss-af83

ISBN

9781303775130

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