Date of Award

Spring 2010

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educ Foundations & Leadership

Program/Concentration

Higher Education

Committee Director

Gwendolyn Lee-Thomas

Committee Member

Danica G. Hays

Committee Member

Cherng-Jyh Yen

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to seek further understanding of how field of study moderated the predictive relationships between social interactions with faculty, academic interactions with faculty, research productivity, and female Ph.D. students' degree completion. A survey was conducted to collect data on the participants' degree completion, satisfaction with social and academic interactions with faculty, research productivity as well as their field of study. The sample included 412 female former Ph.D. students in various fields at a large, public research university in the mid-Atlantic region who were enrolled between 1993 and 2004.

Logistic regression analyses were conducted to see if (1) field of study moderated the predictive relationships between social and academic interactions with faculty, research productivity and degree completion, and if (2) social and academic interactions with faculty and research productivity had predictive utility on degree completion. The results indicated that (1) field of study had no moderator effect on the predictive relationships between social and academic interactions with faculty, research productivity, and degree completion, and (2) none of the predictor variables predicted degree completion.

DOI

10.25777/1cb6-eq37

ISBN

9781124038971

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