Date of Award

Spring 2021

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Foundations & Leadership

Program/Concentration

Community College Leadership

Committee Director

Mitchell R. Williams

Committee Member

Shana Pribesh

Committee Member

David Ayers

Abstract

Latinx students are likely to enter postsecondary education at a community college. This phenomenon has led to the increase in community colleges being designated as Hispanic Serving Institutions. The designation of Hispanic Serving is not driven by mission, but rather by number of enrolled students who identify as Latinx. This preliminary descriptive study examined the perceptions of faculty at four Hispanic Serving community colleges in Texas regarding their proficiency on leadership competencies for faculty, whether there were differences in the perceptions of Latinx and non-Latinx faculty members, and whether certain leadership competencies influence faculty members’ decisions to pursue leadership opportunities.

The participant sites were four urban community colleges that each have over 50% Hispanic/Latinx student enrollment. These colleges were selected because they belong to the same community college system, and therefore are subject to the same policies and procedures as dictated by the governing board and the system’s chancellor.

Survey results indicated that faculty perceived their proficiency at fundamental awareness or novice level in 19 of the 58 competencies included in the survey. Based on the results of a series of one-way ANOVA statistical tests, there was a significant difference between the perceptions of Latinx faculty and other faculty on 5 of the 58 competencies. The results of the study suggest leadership development for Latinx faculty should be a priority for institutions in order to plan for leadership succession which will lead to stronger institutional outcomes.

DOI

10.25777/4ahb-8g08

ISBN

9798516059148

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