Date of Award

Spring 2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educ Foundations & Leadership

Committee Director

Mitchell R. Williams

Committee Member

Shana Pribesh

Committee Member

Christopher Glass

Abstract

High school dual enrollment has increased dramatically in recent years, growing 75% nationally between academic years 2002-03 and 2010-11 (Borden, Taylor, Park, & Seiler, 2013). Proponents of dual enrollment programs cite long-term, positive student outcomes for dual enrollment students: higher GPAs in college as adults (Allen & Dadgar, 2012; Jones, 2014; Karp, Calcagno, Hughes, Jeong, & Bailey, 2007), higher first year persistence rates in college (Jones, 2014; Karp et al., 2007), faster time to degree completion (Allen & Dadgar, 2012; Ganzert, 2014; Hughes, 2016), and higher college graduation rates (Ganzert, 2014; Hughes, 2016). However, very little research has focused on short-term success for dual enrolled students.

Course grades earned in dual enrollment programs become a part of the student’s official college transcript. As such, these grades can impact a student’s ability to be accepted at post-secondary institutions after graduation from high school. In addition, poor grades in dual enrollment courses can negatively affect satisfactory academic progress standards, thus impacting financial aid eligibility as an adult. Therefore, it is important to understand any factors which might improve the chances of student course-level success.

This causal comparative study used ex post facto data from four community colleges to examine the correlation between course delivery location (high school or college campus) for college classes taken by dual enrolled students to student success as defined by final grades in those courses. In addition, this study examined the correlation between course delivery mode (face-to-face, hybrid, or online) for college classes taken by dual enrolled students to student success as defined by final grades in those courses.

The study findings indicated dual enrolled students taking classes on high school sites had higher course grades compared to dual enrolled students taking classes on a college campus. A subset model utilizing data from just one college, however, indicated the opposite. The results also indicated that dual enrolled students taking classes delivered in face-to-face and hybrid modes had higher course grades compared to dual enrolled students taking classes delivered in a fully internet mode. Again, a subset model utilizing data from just one college indicated the opposite.

DOI

10.25777/83v3-tf75

ISBN

9780355883893

ORCID

0000-0002-3102-6938

Share

COinS