Title

Turning Discourse into Action: A Decolonial Case Study of the Italian Occupation of Libya

Student Type

Graduate

University

Old Dominion University

Country

United States

Document Type

Conference Paper

Description/Abstract

Decolonial theory advocates for the multidimensionality of experiences. Transitioning to achieving decolonial frameworks and ending the cycle of dependency is possible only through meaningful change. Françoise Vergès in A Decolonial Feminism, A Feminist Theory of Violence: A Decolonial Perspective, and Cesaire’s Resolutely Black: Conversations with Françoise Vergès deconstructs systemic norms and colonial legacies to inform solidarity-centered approaches to future change in policy making. Vergès advocates for dismantling colonialism, capitalism, racism, imperialism, and all the systems that created cultural superiority, Eurocentrism, white supremacy, and built prisons. When juxtaposed in conversation with Michel Foucault, Franz Fanon, Albert Memmi, Aimé Césaire, and Edward Said, and in conjunction with a case study on the colonization of Libya, we can understand Vergès’ argument on how racial capitalism, imperialism and colonial occupation inevitably produce gendered violence with the complicity of the state.

Disciplines

International and Area Studies

Session Title

Colonialism: Past, Present, and Future

Location

Webb Center, Isle of Wight Room

Start Date

February 2023

End Date

February 2023

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COinS
 
Feb 10th, 11:30 AM Feb 10th, 12:30 PM

Turning Discourse into Action: A Decolonial Case Study of the Italian Occupation of Libya

Webb Center, Isle of Wight Room

Decolonial theory advocates for the multidimensionality of experiences. Transitioning to achieving decolonial frameworks and ending the cycle of dependency is possible only through meaningful change. Françoise Vergès in A Decolonial Feminism, A Feminist Theory of Violence: A Decolonial Perspective, and Cesaire’s Resolutely Black: Conversations with Françoise Vergès deconstructs systemic norms and colonial legacies to inform solidarity-centered approaches to future change in policy making. Vergès advocates for dismantling colonialism, capitalism, racism, imperialism, and all the systems that created cultural superiority, Eurocentrism, white supremacy, and built prisons. When juxtaposed in conversation with Michel Foucault, Franz Fanon, Albert Memmi, Aimé Césaire, and Edward Said, and in conjunction with a case study on the colonization of Libya, we can understand Vergès’ argument on how racial capitalism, imperialism and colonial occupation inevitably produce gendered violence with the complicity of the state.