Date of Award

Spring 1993

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

Committee Director

Harold S. Wilson

Committee Member

Peter C. Stewart

Committee Member

James R. Sweeney

Abstract

This study examines the role that tobacco played in influencing Confederate policy during the American Civil War. Surprisingly, very little research has been done on this subject; historians have virtually ignored the influence of tobacco upon Southern economic interests between 1850 and 1870.

The southern tobacco-producing states grew 439,183,561 pounds of raw tobacco in 1860. Southern manufactured tobacco was worth $21,820,535 in 1860, and along with other agricultural products, especially cotton, played an important economic, political, and diplomatic role in the life of the Confederacy. The tobacco industry represented a very strong interest group in the Upper South during the Civil War.

After the war, tobacco emerged again as the principal cash crop of the Upper South, as consumption became a national pastime.

DOI

10.25777/25rf-3v69

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