Date of Award

Spring 2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Program/Concentration

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Committee Director

Robert Ash

Committee Member

Kamran Daryabeigi

Committee Member

Arthur Taylor

Abstract

Thermal contact resistance is an important parameter in detailed thermal analysis and design of aerospace systems. The ability to determine thermal contact resistance reliably can have a significant impact on the fidelity of thermal models—particularly for space applications. The 2004 NASA Langley Research Center thermal contact resistance test apparatus has been employed to evaluate two methods for inferring estimated interface surface temperatures so that thermal contact resistance can be calculated more accurately. The traditional method of extrapolation is a steady-state approach, while the new method utilizes inverse heat transfer techniques to account for inherent unsteadiness in these quasi-steady-state measurements. The understanding of the uncertainty for the empirical data has helped quantify the reliability of thermal contact resistance. As a result, this study includes a thorough uncertainty analysis so that the two methods could be compared.

DOI

10.25777/mktz-zf27

ISBN

9798641317649

ORCID

0000-0001-6022-4100

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