Document Type

Book Review

Publication Date

2018

Publication Title

SIAM Review

Volume

60

Issue

4

Pages

1016-1020

Abstract

(First paragraph) It came as quite a shock at the time. I cannot recall exactly when it happened, but it certainly caught me by surprise. For most of my life, and certainly from elementary school (or “primary” school in the UK) throughhighschoolIhadbecome usedto seeing posters and books illustrating the “standard” map of the world: the Mercator projection. Of course, Greenwich, London, sat at longitude 0◦ (and still does!). And certainly I knew that planet Earth is spheroidal and that this flat projection distorted the shapes and areas (especially near the polar regions), but somehow I was not prepared for the paradigmatic jolt I received when I encountered the Gall–Peters projection for the first time. “Wait, wait, the world isn’t like that,” I thought. “What’s going on here?” It was just so, well, fascinatingly weird, but alas, I soon lost interest in pursuing that line of thought.... Fortunately, several decades later, I encountered a monograph that re-stimulated my interest in the mathematics of maps [1].

Comments

NOTE: Publisher's version/PDF and author's post-print on author's personal website, institutional website or open access repository.

Copyright © 2018 by SIAM.

Original Publication Citation

Adam, J. A. (2018). The beauty of numbers in nature: Mathematical patterns and principles from the natural world. SIAM Review, 60(4), 1016-1020.

ORCID

0000-0001-5537-2889 (Adam)

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