Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2020

DOI

10.1038/s41598-020-63628-x

Publication Title

Scientific Reports

Volume

10

Pages

6606 (10 pp.)

Abstract

Ventilation of carbon stored in the deep ocean is thought to play an important role in atmospheric CO2 increases associated with Pleistocene deglaciations. The presence of this respired carbon has been recorded by an array of paleoceanographic proxies from various locations across the global ocean. Here we present a new sediment core from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) Ocean spanning the last 180,000 years and reconstruct high-resolution 230Th-derived fluxes of 232Th and excess barium, along with redox-sensitive uranium concentrations to examine past variations in dust delivery, export productivity, and bottom-water oxygenation, respectively. Our bottom-water oxygenation record is compared to other similar high-resolution records from across the Pacific and in the Southern Ocean. We suggest that the deep Pacific is a site of respired carbon storage associated with periods of decreased global atmospheric CO2 concentration during the LGM, confirming the conclusions from a wealth of previous studies. However, our study is the first to show a similar relationship beyond the last glacial, extending to at least 70,000 years.

Comments

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Original Publication Citation

Marcantonio, F., Hostak, R., Hertzberg, J. E., & Schmidt, M. W. (2020). Deep equatorial Pacific Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 over the last Ice Age. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 6606. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63628-x

ORCID

0000-0001-6362-7845 (Schmidt)

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