Date of Award

Spring 2008

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Janis V. Sanchez-Hucles

Committee Director

Kimberly J. Wells

Committee Member

Terry L. Dickinson

Committee Member

Michelle L. Kelley

Abstract

This study examined the effect of household structure on utilization of family-friendly benefits in organizations, as well as the impact that family-friendly benefit utilization has on organizational attraction and workplace withdrawal behaviors among Federal government employees with children. Results showed that alternative work arrangements (e.g., compressed and flexible schedules) were popular among all employees who have children. Family-friendly benefit utilization rates were highest among single parent employees and lowest among traditional family employees. Single parent employees were more likely to use flexible schedules, part-time, compressed schedules, telework, and sick and annual leave. Dual income employees were more likely to use flexible schedules, annual and sick leave, telework, and part-time work. Traditional family employees were more likely to use flexible schedules, annual and sick leave, compressed schedules, and telework. Employees utilizing flexible, part-time and job sharing schedules, telework, annual leave, the Federal child care centers and the Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account (DCFSA) showed higher levels of attraction toward the agency. Lower rates of absenteeism were found for employees who utilized compressed and flexible schedules, the Child Care Subsidy Program, and the DCFSA in lower rates of leave behaviors. Lower rates of absenteeism as measured in number of hours of leave taken were found for employees who utilized job sharing. Employees using flexible schedules, job sharing, telework, annual leave, leave without pay, Federal child care centers, the Child Care Subsidy Program, and the DCFSA displayed higher rates of retention. Turnover intentions within an agency were lower for employees utilizing flexible schedules, telework, leave without pay, and Federal child care centers. Turnover intentions to another an agency were lower for employees that utilized flexible schedules, part-time, telework, sick leave, Federal child care centers, the Child Care Subsidy Program, and the DCFSA. Intentions to turnover and leave the Federal government altogether were lower for employees who utilized compressed schedules, flexible schedules, telework, annual leave, Federal child care centers, and the DCFSA. Results demonstrated differences in employees' use of family-friendly programs and that utilization of family-friendly policies is related to organizational attraction and workplace withdrawal behaviors.

DOI

10.25777/c2y4-py68

ISBN

9780549596806

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