Date of Award

Spring 1995

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Robert P. Archer

Committee Member

John David Ball

Committee Member

Michael L. Stutts

Committee Member

Alex Caldwell

Committee Member

Glynn D. Coates

Abstract

In 1992, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - Adolescent (MMPI-A) was developed to meet the unique experiences and needs of adolescents. Despite evidence that adolescents often demonstrate response biases in taking the MMPI-A, currently there is no method to systematically "correct" for the effect of test-taking attitude on profile configuration with this age group. The K-correction factor has been widely used to correct for defensiveness or underreporting of symptomatology on the MMPI among adult respondents, although results of cross-validation research on the effectiveness of the K-correction factor have been inconclusive. The present study derived age-appropriate K-weights to determine the degree to which adoption of those weights could improve test accuracy in the identification of psychopathology. This study also examined the accuracy of the MMPI-A clinical scales in classifying adolescent normals and psychiatric patients. Discriminant analyses were performed to determine the K-weight scale score combination which best predicted normal versus clinical status for each of the eight clinical scales. Hit rate analyses were used to assess whether the adoption of these K-weights would result in improved classification accuracy. Results indicated that adoption of a K-correction factor did not improve test accuracy and did not support future use of a K-correction factor in scoring MMPI-A protocols.

Comments

A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculties of The College of William and Mary, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk State University, and Old Dominion University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology through the Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology.

DOI

10.25777/ks96-am02

Share

COinS