Date of Award

Summer 1995

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Robin J. Lewis

Committee Member

Ellen F. Rosen

Committee Member

John David Ball

Committee Member

W. Larry Ventis

Committee Member

Louis H. Janda

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between elements of two dream content analysis systems, and between dream content variables and self-report measures. One hundred and five college students from two universities in Virginia completed the following self-report measures: Generalized Expectancy for Success Scale (Fibel & Hale, 1978), Internal Control Index (Duttweiler, 1984), Conflict Tactics Scale (Straus, 1979), Verbal Aggressiveness Scale (Infante & Wigley, 1986), and Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis & Spencer, 1982). They recorded any dreams they could remember over the subsequent three weeks in a dream journal. Only the data of participants who reported five or more dreams were included (n = 83). Dream content was analyzed using Hall and Van de Castle's (1966) and Gaillard and Phelippeau's (1977) dream content analysis systems. Hall and Van de Castle's Successful Dream Outcome was significantly correlated with Gaillard and Phelippeau's Active Control. Hall and Van de Castle's Verbal Aggressive Interactions was significantly correlated with Gaillard and Phelippeau's Verbal Aggressiveness and Physical Aggressiveness. Hall and Van de Castle's Physical Aggressive Interactions was significantly correlated with Gaillard and Phelippeau's Physical Aggressiveness. The Verbal Aggressiveness Scale was significantly correlated with Gaillard and Phelippeau's Physical Aggressiveness. Contrary to expectation, other dream content was unrelated to personality measures. Several unanticipated correlations were obtained. There appears to be considerable overlap between some aspects of Hall and Van de Castle's and Gaillard and Phelippeau's systems. The results fail to identify a direct relationship between specific dream content categories and specific personality variables. This relationship may not exist, or may be less direct, involving combinations of dream content variables.

Comments

A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculties of The College of William and Mary, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk State University, and Old Dominion University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology through the Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology.

DOI

10.25777/rzrf-g797

Share

COinS