Date of Award

Winter 1997

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Abaineh Workie

Committee Member

Janis Sanchez-Hucles

Committee Member

William Colson

Committee Member

Robin Lewis

Committee Member

Michael Nichols

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of race and socioeconomic status on the acceptance of biracial individuals having one Black and one White parent. A sample of 153 Black and 114 White college students were divided into high- and low-socioeconomic status based on demographic information. Acceptance of biracial individuals was measured by 2 modified versions of the Social Distance Scale (SDS1 and SDS2) developed by Bogardus (1928), a shortened version of the Scale To Measure Attitudes Toward Defined Groups (AS) developed by Grice (1934), and a measure of Perceived Commonality (PC) developed by Feather (1980). The Marlowe-Crowne (1960) Social Desirability Scale (SD) was also included to assess for socially desirable response tendencies. Results of the 2 x 2 ANOVA, indicated no statistically significant differences between groups on SDS1, SDS2, and PC. On AS, however, Whites reported more acceptance of biracial individuals than Blacks, with both groups reporting high levels of acceptance. No significant differences were found for the main effect of SES. Group means on SDS1, SDS2, AS, and PC indicate that both Blacks and Whites reported acceptance of biracial individuals.

Comments

A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculties of The College of William and Mary, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk State University, and Old Dominion University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology through the Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology.

DOI

10.25777/d739-2y24

ISBN

9780591815757

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