Date of Award

Spring 1991

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Program/Concentration

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Committee Director

Albert S. Glickman

Committee Member

Glynn D. Coates

Committee Member

Raymond H. Kirby

Committee Member

Judith Schapiro

Abstract

This study examined the decision-making process of individuals in dual-career couples when faced with a job opportunity in a distant city. The purpose was to determine which factors would be given the most importance by males and females during the decision process.

Each scenario presented an identical situation in which the participant was offered a job in a distant city. Following this paragraph were five brief statements representing five factors; job opportunities for self, job opportunities for spouse, career commitment--self, career commitment--spouse, and economic considerations. Two levels (moderate and high) of each factor were used in order to manipulate the desirability of the situation. Participants were asked to indicate whether or not they would relocate based only on the information provided.

A 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 (gender, job opportunities for self, job opportunities for spouse, career commitment--self, career commitment--spouse, economic considerations) ANOVA was performed to provide an overall picture of the data. Results indicated a significant interaction between job opportunities for self and one's career commitment. Multiple regression analyses indicated that job opportunities for self was given significantly more weight when career commitment for self was high than when career commitment was moderate. Additionally, job opportunities for spouse was given significantly more weight when career commitment for spouse was high than when career commitment for spouse was moderate.

The ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for sex. Males gave significantly more weight to the job opportunities for spouse, followed respectively by job opportunities for self, and economic considerations. The females indicated that job opportunities for spouse was given significantly more weight than the other factors. However, with the females there was not a significant difference between job opportunities for self and economic considerations. Post hoc analyses based on age were also conducted.

The findings of the research reveal that for both men and women significantly more weight was given to the job opportunities of their spouse than any other factor when engaged in relocation decision-making. Several interpretations of the findings are presented. Implications for dual-career couples, organizational policy, methodological issues and future studies are also discussed.

DOI

10.25777/gjrg-3711

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