Date of Award

Spring 1996

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Perry Duncan

Committee Member

Mark Scerbo

Committee Member

Barry Gillen

Abstract

This study presented a method in which the Stroop Color Word Test can be adapted to an auditory form. This auditory test used a series of animal words, animal sounds and word-sound combinations. This "Animal-Word-and-Sound test" contained three subtests. The test tasks were to repeat a list of words, identify a list of animal sounds, and to identify the sound in a combined animal word-sound pairings (Both the animal's name and sound are presented simultaneously). An alternate form of this audio test was examined. The alternate form followed the same construction except in the final condition, the task was to identify the spoken word. Twenty-eight undergraduate college students from Old Dominion University participated in the experiment. A comparison was made between two groups. One group received the Animal Word and Sound Test, the other, received an alternate form of the test. Both groups were given the Stroop Color and Word test for comparison. Participants' response times were recorded, and analyzed by means of a Multiple Analysis of Variance. The results showed that interference can be created from the association of animal names to the corresponding sound that animal makes. Theoretical implications of a comparison to the Stroop test were also discussed.

DOI

10.25777/j7n8-ha02

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