Date of Award

Winter 1997

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Program/Concentration

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Committee Director

Mark W. Scerbo

Committee Member

Glynn D. Coates

Committee Member

James R. Comstock, Jr.

Committee Member

Raymond H. Kirby

Committee Member

Danielle S. McNamara

Abstract

The present study examined how different communication patterns affected task performance with an adaptive interface. A Wizard-of-Oz simulation (Gould, Conti, & Hovanyecz, 1983) was used to create the impression of a talking and listening computer that acted as a teammate to help participants interact with a computer application.

Four levels of communication mode were used which differed in the level of restriction placed on human-computer communication. In addition, participants completed two sets of tasks (simple and complex). Further, a personality trait, Desire for Control (DC), was measured and participants were split into high and low groups for analysis. Dependent measures included number of tasks completed in a given time period as well as subjective ratings of the interaction. In addition, participants' utterances were assessed for verbosity, disfluencies, and indices of common ground.

DOI

10.25777/k248-4361

ISBN

9780591623291

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