Date of Award

Spring 2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

Program/Concentration

Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology

Committee Director

Barbara Winstead

Committee Member

Delanyard Robinson

Committee Member

Rick Frieden

Committee Member

Janis Sanchez-Hucles

Committee Member

Desideria S. Hacker

Abstract

Attributions of partners have been examined in the depressive symptom-relationship satisfaction literature, while attributions of self have not been adequately addressed. In the present study, attributions of self and partner were investigated as mediators of the association between depressive symptoms and relationship satisfaction. A student and community sample of 270 adults in heterosexual romantic relationships completed an online survey consisting of depressive symptom, relationship satisfaction, and relationship attribution inventories. Pearson's product-moment correlation and multiple regression analyses were utilized to assess meditational pathways. Depressive symptoms were significantly negatively correlated with relationship satisfaction. Self- and partner-attributions were significantly positively correlated with relationship satisfaction. Self- and partner-attributions did not mediate the relationship between depressive symptoms and relationship satisfaction. Rather, results indicated that depressive symptoms and partner-attributions were significant predictors of relationship satisfaction, but self-attributions were not. Partner-attributions were found to partially mediate the depressive symptom-relationship satisfaction link for the student subsample. Clinical implications, limitations of the present study and considerations for future research are also discussed.

Comments

A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculties of The College of William and Mary, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk State University, Old Dominion University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology through the Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology.

DOI

10.25777/84g5-1g81

ISBN

9781124663951

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