Date of Award

Fall 12-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Michelle L. Kelley

Committee Member

Alan Meca

Committee Member

Yusuke Yamani

Abstract

Reintegration is a challenge for many veterans returning to civilian roles after military service. Difficulties range from an assortment of issues such as self-care to community participation. Military sexual trauma may be an experience that alters or changes veterans and result in difficulty in reintegration. Specifically, it was predicted that military sexual trauma would indirectly affect reintegration, via depressive symptoms. In addition, locus of control was predicted to play a role in how military sexual trauma impacts reintegration with external locus of control acting as a buffer. Participants were a cross-sectional community sample of both female veterans who reported having experienced and not experienced. They completed an online survey. Both endorsing military sexual harassment and military sexual assault predicted reintegration difficulties; however, depressive symptoms fully mediated associations between both forms of military sexual trauma (i.e., sexual harassment and sexual assault) and reintegration difficulties. Locus of control did not significantly moderate the pathway between military sexual trauma and reintegration nor the pathway between military sexual trauma and depressive symptoms. In fact, the significant direct associations of locus of control on depressive symptoms and reintegration were in the opposite direction of what was predicted in that external locus of control was associated with more reintegration difficulties and depressive symptoms. The results suggest the importance of reducing military sexual trauma and reintegration assistance programs.

DOI

10.25777/ycjk-jp42

ORCID

000-0002-9874-4213

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