Date of Award

Spring 2006

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Jennifer A. Morrow

Committee Member

Bryan E. Porter

Committee Member

Janis Sanchez-Hucles

Committee Member

Shana Pribesh

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine what initial attitudes and behaviors first-year college students had about the environment and how they changed as a result of a taking a required global environmentalism course. A second goal in this study was to learn whether there were differences in environmental attitudes and behaviors based on gender and ethnicity. Participants in this study were first-year students at Old Dominion University enrolled in a mandatory general education course, New Portals to Appreciating the Global Environment ( GEN 101 ). An online survey was completed that measured the participants' attitudes and behaviors related to the environment at the beginning and end of the semester. Repeated Measures ANOVAs were performed in order to test for differences in attitudes, concerns, and behaviors based on time (pretest, posttest). Between subjects ANOV As were used to test for differences in attitudes, concerns, and behaviors based on gender (male, female) and ethnicity (Black/ AfricanAmerican, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and Caucasian). Hierarchical multiple regressions with interactions were used to determine which variables (i.e., gender, ethnicity, pretest scores, and their interactions) serve as predictors of environmental attitudes and behaviors.

DOI

10.25777/543v-r427

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