Date of Award

Summer 2002

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Committee Director

Debra A. Major

Committee Member

Glynn D. Coates

Committee Member

Barbara Winstead

Committee Member

Nancy Olivo

Abstract

The present study examined a time-based model of work-family conflict for a sample of 176 working women with childcare responsibilities. Building on the work of Edwards and Rothbard (2000) and role theory, a model was proposed to test the specific variables that define time-based work-family conflict. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the proposed hypotheses. Contrary to assumptions about time-based conflict, the results suggest that role time has a very limited impact on work-family conflict. Variables that were related to role performance and satisfaction included traditional gender role expectations, family involvement, family instrumental support, leader-member exchange, role overload, and organizational family-friendliness. The current research also presented two new variables labeled work and family distractions. Work distractions appear to have a very harmful impact on work outcomes and warrant further investigation. Although time-based conflict was not supported in the present study, the current data offered credence for a number of alternative explanations.

DOI

10.25777/6jhg-r876

ISBN

9780493883113

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