Trends in Atmospheric HFC-23 (CHF3) and HFC-134a Abundances

Title

Trends in Atmospheric HFC-23 (CHF3) and HFC-134a Abundances

College

College of Sciences

Program

Ph.D. Physics

Publication Date

3-28-2019

Abstract

The Montreal Protocol banned the production of major ozone depleting substances such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to protect the Earth’s ozone layer. The emission of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) has increased to replace the CFCs. As a result, the atmospheric abundance of HFCs are rapidly increasing. Although these HFCs do not contribute to the depletion of the ozone layer because they contain no chlorine, they are powerful greenhouse gases with large global warming potentials. In January 2019, the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol came into force to phase out long-lived HFCs. The two most abundant HFCs in the atmosphere, HFC-134a (CF3CH2F) and HFC-23 (CHF3) are measured from orbit by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These measurements are useful for monitoring the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. The ACE measurements provide the first global distributions and confirm the rapid increase in HFC-134a (4.6±0.2 ppt per year) and CHF3 (0.78±0.05 ppt per year) abundances.

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Trends in Atmospheric HFC-23 (CHF3) and HFC-134a Abundances


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