Date of Award

Spring 2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educ Curriculum/Instruction

Committee Director

Jill E. Stefaniak

Committee Member

John Baaki

Committee Member

Lynn L. Wiles

Abstract

This study explored the effects the Behavioral Analysis Feedback (BAF) Model had on improving nursing student’s performance. Research studies surrounding feedback primarily centered on frameworks designed as models for delivering feedback as well as the timing for delivering feedback. In addition, past research has also focused on individual elements that affect performance with little regard to environmental elements. The BAF Model was conceptualized based on the importance of providing feedback to nursing students while emphasizing three individual and three environmental elements that have the potential to influence behavior.

This multiple measure, single-case study utilized a quasi-experimental pre-post intervention study design. This research study also utilized a prescriptive script for nursing educators to deliver behavior-specific feedback with an emphasis on individual and environmental elements known to affect performance. It incorporated qualitative survey instruments to track feedback and assess nursing student performance. A follow-on interview was conducted with nursing educators to gain further insight into the nursing educator’s feelings and experiences with using the BAF Model. Ultimately, the objective of this study was to provide some evidence that suggests whether performance is affected with feedback utilizing the BAF Model. Nursing educator perceptions for delivering feedback, nursing student’s attitudes for receiving feedback, and alignment of performer skillsets and organizational resources after utilizing the BAF Model were also explored.

Results indicated using the BAF Model to deliver behavior-specific feedback using a list of performance standards led to the overall improvement of performance among nursing students. Results also indicated using the prescriptive script to deliver feedback served as one reason nursing student’s performance might have increased. In addition, results indicated the nursing student’s receptivity towards receiving feedback did not improve or deteriorate after being exposed to the BAF Model. The lack of improvement or deterioration could be a direct result of the sample size being too small (n=14) to consider results statistically significant. Additionally, results indicated nursing educators developed the skills needed to deliver behavior-specific feedback and motivated them to do so; however, perception towards delivering feedback improved, deteriorated, and remained the same for different elements after being exposed to the BAF Model. The lack of improvement or deterioration could be a direct result of the sample size being too small (n=5) to consider results statistically significant. Last, results indicated there was a close alignment of the information, instrumentation, and motivation between the individual and environmental level after exposure to the BAF Model.

DOI

10.25777/tqyr-t023

ISBN

9780355885118

ORCID

0000-0002-3755-2787

Share

COinS