Date of Award

Winter 2007

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program/Concentration

Occupational and Technical Studies

Committee Director

John M. Ritz

Committee Member

Philip A. Reed

Committee Member

Molly H. Duggan

Abstract

This study investigated whether selected information would change dislocated workers' deterrents to education participation. The study also explored whether information presentation method altered the participants' perceived deterrents. Finally, the study explored whether self-concept or role salience as a student moderated information reception.

The population included North Carolina workers pending job dislocation from three manufacturing plants. The final analysis included results from 194 workers. Participants were randomly assigned to groups using a roster having random group assignments and case numbers.

A three-group, quasi-experimental design explored changes in education deterrents. Three instruments provided data: the Adult Learning Questionnaire, Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, Second Edition, and Salience Inventory. Treatment materials included eight brochures written below a 5th-grade reading level, and a video presenting the same information. Topics included job loss grief, employment barriers, job search assistance, income support, upgrading skills, health care, transportation, and childcare.

Data from two Adult Learning Questionnaire administrations were used for factor analysis. These results were compared to evaluate hypothesis H1: Delivery of dislocated worker supporting services information will change the deterrent factor structure, indicating changed perceptions of deterrents to education participation. The factor structure changed from pretest to posttest; hypothesis H1 was accepted.

Data from the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, Second Edition, and Salience Inventory was used for comparisons of group differences. These tests evaluated the second and third hypotheses: H2: Dislocated workers who receive verbal information combined with written information will report significantly more changes on the Adult Learning Questionnaire than either the written-information or the no-information groups when the effect of self-concept is held constant; and H3: Dislocated workers who receive verbal information combined with written information will report significantly more changes on the Adult Learning Questionnaire than either the written-information or the no-information groups when the effect of salience as a student is held constant. The analyses of covariance were not significant; Hypotheses H2 and H3 were rejected.

This study identified education deterrent factors reported by dislocated workers. Further, with a population reporting lower educational attainment and family income, this study replicated studies. Additionally, the study provided a prototype of materials designed expressly for low-literate dislocated workers.

DOI

10.25777/mnjt-2967

ISBN

9780549320425

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