Title

“I'm Starting with the Man in the Mirror”: Albrecht Dürer’s Self-Portraits Reconsidered

Presentation Type

Event

Disciplines

History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Description/Abstract

Albrecht Dürer’s oeuvre is replete with a considerable volume of self-portraits. When considering Dürer’s self-images many art historians neglect a fundamental aspect required for properly reading the artist’s work: the societal impact derived from the undulating religious climate of Dürer’s epoch. Previous oversight of religion’s significance has left many chasms in the interpretations of Dürer’s self-renderings. This paper examines selected works by Dürer, diary excerpts and letters, along with concurrent rifts in German spiritual doctrine to establish religious dogmas held by the artist ultimately leading to a pellucid interpretation of Dürer’s self-portraits as statements of the artist’s conviction of faith.

Comments

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Anne H. Muraoka

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Room 1306

Start Date

13-2-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

13-2-2016 11:15 AM

Full Text of Presentation

wf_no

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 13th, 10:15 AM Feb 13th, 11:15 AM

“I'm Starting with the Man in the Mirror”: Albrecht Dürer’s Self-Portraits Reconsidered

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Room 1306

Albrecht Dürer’s oeuvre is replete with a considerable volume of self-portraits. When considering Dürer’s self-images many art historians neglect a fundamental aspect required for properly reading the artist’s work: the societal impact derived from the undulating religious climate of Dürer’s epoch. Previous oversight of religion’s significance has left many chasms in the interpretations of Dürer’s self-renderings. This paper examines selected works by Dürer, diary excerpts and letters, along with concurrent rifts in German spiritual doctrine to establish religious dogmas held by the artist ultimately leading to a pellucid interpretation of Dürer’s self-portraits as statements of the artist’s conviction of faith.