Title

Diet Components of Waterfowl Wintering in Virginia

Presentation Type

Event

Description/Abstract

Understanding the diets of waterfowl is critically important to the preservation and conservation of waterfowl on the eastern coast of Virginia. Diets of waterfowl have been intensely studied over the past century but the diets of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), Gadwalls (Anas strepera), and Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) have not been studied in southeastern Virginia, an important wintering stopover area for migrating waterfowl. The most common seed species found in all samples was Pennsylvania smartweed and Smith’s bulrush. Waterfowl have high nutritional demands when migrating and a higher preference for natural grain because of its high carbohydrate and mineral content.

Comments

Faculty Mentor: Eric Walters

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Conference Room 1310

Start Date

13-2-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

13-2-2016 10:00 AM

Full Text of Presentation

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Feb 13th, 9:00 AM Feb 13th, 10:00 AM

Diet Components of Waterfowl Wintering in Virginia

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Conference Room 1310

Understanding the diets of waterfowl is critically important to the preservation and conservation of waterfowl on the eastern coast of Virginia. Diets of waterfowl have been intensely studied over the past century but the diets of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), Gadwalls (Anas strepera), and Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) have not been studied in southeastern Virginia, an important wintering stopover area for migrating waterfowl. The most common seed species found in all samples was Pennsylvania smartweed and Smith’s bulrush. Waterfowl have high nutritional demands when migrating and a higher preference for natural grain because of its high carbohydrate and mineral content.