Title

Form and Function: Anatomy Abstracted [Metals]

Presenting Author Name/s

Betty Gowans

Faculty Advisor

Jane Ritchie

Presentation Type

Artwork

Disciplines

Fine Arts | Metal and Jewelry Arts

Description/Abstract

Artist Statement

Parts of the body are explored through the abstraction of their forms and translation of those forms into metal sculptures and wearables. Through the lost wax casting technique and other metalsmithing processes, the body is combined with various textures to examine and contemplate fluidity, rigidity, feeling, and function. This exploration of texture and tactile quality is not only in reference to the human body and the natural world, but the various properties of the metal that comprises the work. Further, by altering the scale of the anatomical abstractions, it allows the viewer and the wearer to consider their relationship to the form, as well as the concepts of dysmorphia and anxiety. Overall, these works intend to provoke the viewer and the wearer to become more aware of their body, their emotions, and their environment.

Session Title

Art Exhibit

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northeast Atrium

Start Date

3-2-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

3-2-2018 12:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 3rd, 8:00 AM Feb 3rd, 12:30 PM

Form and Function: Anatomy Abstracted [Metals]

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northeast Atrium

Artist Statement

Parts of the body are explored through the abstraction of their forms and translation of those forms into metal sculptures and wearables. Through the lost wax casting technique and other metalsmithing processes, the body is combined with various textures to examine and contemplate fluidity, rigidity, feeling, and function. This exploration of texture and tactile quality is not only in reference to the human body and the natural world, but the various properties of the metal that comprises the work. Further, by altering the scale of the anatomical abstractions, it allows the viewer and the wearer to consider their relationship to the form, as well as the concepts of dysmorphia and anxiety. Overall, these works intend to provoke the viewer and the wearer to become more aware of their body, their emotions, and their environment.