Presenting Author Name/s

Peter Ahl

Faculty Advisor

Eddie Hill

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Sports Studies

Description/Abstract

Rock climbing is a sport that requires a participant to lift the body against gravity to climb on a rock face using the irregularities of the rock. On a highly rated climb, the rock face is “virtually perpendicular and the irregularities are very small” (Li, Margetts, & Fowler, 2001; Slanger & Rudestam, 1997, p. 359). Although some researchers have maintained that rock climbing involves both sensation seeking and risk taking as the key elements to one’s motivation for participation (Palmer, 2002), others have researched the possibility of characteristics that are unique to rock climbers, which set the rock climbing community apart from the other extreme sports (Kiewa, 2001; Slanger & Rudestam, 1997).

Although rock climbing was seen as an outdoor sport for few who chose to live life outside high on the mountain side, more recent years the sport of climbing has become more main stream. It is now in the Olympics, many YMCAs, middle schools, and colleges. College climbing programs have become increasingly popular. Yet, we have very little evidence of the benefits of rock climbing of “indoor settings” especially on college campuses. The current study seeks to examine the health benefits among college rock climbers. In the spring of 2017, approximately 300 college student rock climbers will complete the Perceived Heath Outcomes of Recreation Scale (PHORS) using the online survey software Qualtrics.

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Start Date

3-2-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

3-2-2018 12:30 PM

Full Text of Presentation

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Feb 3rd, 8:00 AM Feb 3rd, 12:30 PM

Assessing the Benefits of College Climbing Programs: Applying the Perceived Health Outcomes of Recreation Scale

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Rock climbing is a sport that requires a participant to lift the body against gravity to climb on a rock face using the irregularities of the rock. On a highly rated climb, the rock face is “virtually perpendicular and the irregularities are very small” (Li, Margetts, & Fowler, 2001; Slanger & Rudestam, 1997, p. 359). Although some researchers have maintained that rock climbing involves both sensation seeking and risk taking as the key elements to one’s motivation for participation (Palmer, 2002), others have researched the possibility of characteristics that are unique to rock climbers, which set the rock climbing community apart from the other extreme sports (Kiewa, 2001; Slanger & Rudestam, 1997).

Although rock climbing was seen as an outdoor sport for few who chose to live life outside high on the mountain side, more recent years the sport of climbing has become more main stream. It is now in the Olympics, many YMCAs, middle schools, and colleges. College climbing programs have become increasingly popular. Yet, we have very little evidence of the benefits of rock climbing of “indoor settings” especially on college campuses. The current study seeks to examine the health benefits among college rock climbers. In the spring of 2017, approximately 300 college student rock climbers will complete the Perceived Heath Outcomes of Recreation Scale (PHORS) using the online survey software Qualtrics.