Presenting Author Name/s

Stephanie Jen, Jacob Waits, Amanda Pedrazoli, Kenneisha Edmonds

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Kimberly Adams Tufts

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Infectious Disease | Nursing | Public Health and Community Nursing | Public Health Education and Promotion

Description/Abstract

With the progression of standardized HIV treatment and antiretroviral drugs, the outcomes for people living with HIV (PLHIV) have improved from a death sentence to a manageable chronic disease. Although PLHIV are living longer than before, they experience multi-morbidities more frequently and earlier than persons without HIV. These morbidities, such as type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity, are associated with sedentary lifestyles. It is well-established in the research of the general population that regular physical activity is a health promotion behavior that can prevent and/or mitigate the onset and severity of chronic diseases. Also recent meta-analyses have linked exercise to improved cardio-respiratory fitness in PLHIV. However, evidence has shown that PLHIV exercise on average 1.4 hours per week, which is 0.7 hours less than in the general U.S. population, indicating that PLHIV may have increased risk factors for morbidities associated with a sedentary lifestyle. Peer educators play a significant role in HIV care and treatment settings to facilitate health promotion by encouraging positive changes in attitudes and behavior. We aim to investigate the differences in physical activity, exercise patterns, and physical fitness between PLHIV who are peer educators and PLHIV who are non-peer educators. In addition, we will explore measures of physical and mental health as well as tobacco and substance use, which will assess the daily functioning and health harming habits of PLHIV who are peer educators as compared to PLHIV who are non-peer educators.

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

Start Date

3-2-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

3-2-2018 12:30 PM

Full Text of Presentation

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Jen2018HIV.pdf (437 kB)

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Feb 3rd, 8:00 AM Feb 3rd, 12:30 PM

Exploring the Influence of the Peer Educator Role on Physical Activity, Exercise Patterns, Physical Fitness, Daily Functioning, and Health Harming Habits in People Living with HIV

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northwest Atrium

With the progression of standardized HIV treatment and antiretroviral drugs, the outcomes for people living with HIV (PLHIV) have improved from a death sentence to a manageable chronic disease. Although PLHIV are living longer than before, they experience multi-morbidities more frequently and earlier than persons without HIV. These morbidities, such as type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity, are associated with sedentary lifestyles. It is well-established in the research of the general population that regular physical activity is a health promotion behavior that can prevent and/or mitigate the onset and severity of chronic diseases. Also recent meta-analyses have linked exercise to improved cardio-respiratory fitness in PLHIV. However, evidence has shown that PLHIV exercise on average 1.4 hours per week, which is 0.7 hours less than in the general U.S. population, indicating that PLHIV may have increased risk factors for morbidities associated with a sedentary lifestyle. Peer educators play a significant role in HIV care and treatment settings to facilitate health promotion by encouraging positive changes in attitudes and behavior. We aim to investigate the differences in physical activity, exercise patterns, and physical fitness between PLHIV who are peer educators and PLHIV who are non-peer educators. In addition, we will explore measures of physical and mental health as well as tobacco and substance use, which will assess the daily functioning and health harming habits of PLHIV who are peer educators as compared to PLHIV who are non-peer educators.